Online market research is being carried out to gauge whether people would be prepared to pay to view "Premiership football highlights" on The Sun's website.

The survey, by hpi research, states that the paper is "considering charging" for the service. If so, people would need to take out a monthly subscription to view the relevant part of the paper's site.

Then it asks how people feel about such a charge, asking: "which one of the following describes what you would do?"

a) I would not subscribe - I would never pay to access a newspaper's website; b) If they had a trial offer/free trial, I would sign up to see what it was like and decide what to do at the end of the trial period; c) I would definitely subscribe; d) Don't know.

Aside from the likelihood that answer b will be favourite, and that answer a is two questions rather than one, the second clause is really interesting: "I would never pay to access a newspaper's website."

It could be taken to be a subtle attempt to ascertain how readers feel about being charged for all online access ahead of the paper putting up the paywall that News International's chief executive, Mike Darcey, last month said was inevitable.

At the time, my colleague, Lisa O'Carroll, wrote that September looked to be the likely date for the paywall to go up. With the Premier League season beginning on 17 August, it could allow for a couple of weeks' trial before online charges are introduced.