Barnsley

Ownership

Owned by UK based businessman, Patrick Cryne

Turnover £9.1m

23rd highest in the league

Wage bill £7.7m

23rd highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 85%

Directors’ pay £130,000 for two directors, Maurice Watkins and Barry Taylor

Profit before tax £1.9m

Net debt £3.6m

Interest payable £0.015m

Accounts for the year to 31 May 2013

State they’re in

The club have struggled to survive in the Championship, were relegated this season and these accounts show why. In a deprived former mining town, they try to balance the books and make a small profit, on the division’s second lowest income. Maurice Watkins, the ex-Manchester United director, is now Barnsley’s chairman and his firm, Brabners, issued a legal challenge to the Football League contesting FFP, although Barnsley supports the rules. Watkins says there is no conflict

Birmingham City

Ownership

Owned by Cayman Islands company Birmingham International Holdings plc. Convicted money launderer Carson Yeung owns 15% of that company

Turnover £24.2m

5th highest in the league

Wage bill £22.9m

7th highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 95%

Directors’ pay £389,620 paid to Peter Pannu.

Loss before tax £4m

Net debt Not stated; total loans £24.6m

Interest payable £1m

Accounts for the year to 31 May 2013

State they’re in

Hideous situation for the stalwart club, bought in 2009 by a Hong Kong listed company fronted by major shareholder Carson Yeung, who earlier this year was convicted and jailed for money-laundering, including on behalf of a suspected triad gangster. Yeung family members remain on City’s board, which is principally run by Peter Pannu, a long term Hong Kong associate of Yeung’s who earns handsomely from the club. City are said to be for sale, but no better owners have been able to conclude a deal.

Blackburn Rovers

Ownership

Owned by Venky’s, the Indian chicken company

Turnover £26.9m

4th highest in the league

Wage bill £36.6m

2nd highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 136%

Directors’ pay

£747,960 paid to 6 directors, including £223,776 in pay-offs

Loss before tax £36.5m

Net debt £54.5m

Interest payable £0.464m

Accounts for the year to 30 June 2013

State they’re in

The scrambled mess of Rovers under Venky’s, the Indian chicken company, laid bare. Venky’s took over in 2010 a club competing in the Premier League without major investment from its then owner, the trustees of the late steel magnate Jack Walker’s estate. They immediately sacked Sam Allardyce, appointed Steve Kean as manager, before the well-regarded board resigned, and Rovers were relegated. Now being run more steadily, but huge losses mean club looks incapable of complying with the FFP rules

Blackpool

Ownership

76% owned by local businessman Owen Oyston; 20% by Latvian banker Valeri Belokon

Turnover £22m

7th highest in the league

Wage bill £11.6m

22nd highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 53%

Directors’ pay

£568,024 to 6 directors; highest was paid £452,562

Profit before tax £4.6m

Net debt Nil - £3.1m cash in the bank

Interest payable Nil

Accounts for the year to 30 June 2013

State they’re in

Supporters have targeted protests against the owners, the Oyston family, who unforgettably paid themselves £11m in a salary from the windfall of Blackpool’s 2010-11 Premier League season. Owen Oyston’s son Karl, the chairman, insisted then he will not spend the club’s money on excessive players’ wages, and the accounts bear that out. Blackpool were one of only four clubs to make a profit, with wages a sensible 53% of turnover. Parachute payments are running out, though, and fans complain that the moment for ambition, funded by that £11m, was lost

Bolton Wanderers

Ownership

Owned by the Isle of Man businessman Edwin Davies via Fildraw private trust company, registered in Bermuda.

Turnover £35m

Highest in the league

Wage bill £37.4m

Highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 107%

Directors’ pay

£792,000 paid to 6 directors; £408,000 the highest

Loss before tax £50.6m

Net debt £163.8m

Interest payable £7.5m

Accounts for the year to 31 May 2013

State they’re in

Spectacular £50.6m loss in the first season after relegation, despite parachute payments. Bolton’s 1997 move to the Reebok stadium was accompanied by building a hotel and plans for diverse earnings which would subsidise the club to compete above its natural level. Premier League wages then soared, though, and Bolton have made massive losses. They are supported by Edwin Davies, the kettle element manufacturer whose loans were up to a staggering £151m. Davies charged £7m interest and other fees in 2012-13, but now charges no interest

Brighton and Hove Albion

Ownership

Owned by Tony Bloom, a professional gambler based in Brighton.

Turnover £23.4m

6th highest in the league

Wage bill £21m

8th highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 90%

Directors’ pay £801,038 for 10 directors, highest got £480,002

Loss before tax £14.8m

Net debt Not stated: £51m loans

Interest payable £0.006m

Accounts for the year to 30 June 2013

State they’re in

Epitomise the crushing economics of the Championship, losing £14.8m even with the huge boost gained by the move to the new American Express community stadium in 2011. Reliant on investment from Tony Bloom, a professional gambler whose family have long involvement in the club, Brighton support FFP, and are pledging to move towards breaking even

Bristol City

Ownership

Owned by UK based financial services businessman Stephen Lansdown

Turnover £8m

Lowest in the league

Wage bill £15.2m

14th in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 190%

Directors’ pay £252,034 paid to three directors; highest £129,603

Loss before tax £11.3m

Net debt Not stated; £6.7m in loans

Interest payable £0.061m

Accounts for the year to 31 May 2013

State they’re in

Fairly desperate time for Bristol City, who spent nearly twice their turnover, the Championship’s lowest, on players’ wages, but still finished bottom, 15 points short of safety. Long supported by Stephen Lansdown, reportedly a billionaire, who made his fortune in financial advice and investment with his firm Hargreaves Lansdown. He converted almost £30m of loans to equity during 2012-13, and City are now battling in League One to reverse the long underperformance of Bristol football

Burnley

Ownership

Owned by local and UK-based businessmen Mike Garlick: 31.21%, John Banaszkiewicz: 26.48%, Brendan Flood: 15.22%, other directors: 18.95%

Turnover £15.3m

13th highest in the league

Wage bill £15.4m

13th highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 100%

Directors’ pay None of the directors were paid

Loss before tax £7.6m

Net debt £12.2m

Interest payable £1m

Accounts for the year to 30 June 2013

State they’re in

Hailed as a more traditionally-run, locally owned success story when Sean Dyche won a splendid promotion this season, but the figures show the difficult financial struggle at Turf Moor. Burnley still received parachute payments in 2012-13, and this season, from their 2009-10 visit to the Premier League, yet still made an operating loss of £8.2m, the second worst in their history. The accounts warn of cost-cutting, and being “almost entirely reliant” on the directors – then promotion was won, and makes their strategy seem brilliant

Cardiff City

Ownership

Largest shareholder is Tan Sri Dato’ Seri Vincent Tan Chee Yioun, who owns 51%.

Turnover £17.3m

10th highest in the league

Wage bill £32.8m

3rd highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 190%

Directors’ pay £107,000 for 8 directors.

Loss before tax £30.4m

Net debt Not stated: £85.3m to owners/others

Interest payable £5.3m

Accounts for the year to 31 May 2013

State they’re in

The football world knows a lot more about the regime at Cardiff City of the Malaysian owner Vincent Tan than while the club was still in the Championship, he was changing the colour of the kit to red and lending his way to promotion. Cardiff’s loss, £30.4m at a club on the ascendant, spending almost double their income on players’ wages, is a monument, with that of Hull City, to the crazy current cost of promotion

Charlton Athletic

Ownership

Owned by Belgian businessman Roland Ducatelet via his company, Staprix NV, registered in Belgium.

Turnover £11.9m

20th highest in the league

Wage bill £12m

20th highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 101%

Directors’ pay £164,000 for 8 directors; highest paid received £151,000

Loss before tax £6m

Net debt Not stated: £31.9m loans owed

Interest payable £0.371m

Accounts for the year to 30 June 2013

State they’re in

A long way from their Premier League years, as recent as 2007, when at the rebuilt Valley Charlton seemed a model modern football club. Relegated again in 2009, then stabilised and won promotion to the Championship in 2012. The accounts for the first season back state that the wage bill, higher than the club’s entire income, was “clearly unsustainable.” The future is uncertain as part of a “network” of clubs owned by Roland Duchatelet, headed by Standard Liege in his home country, in Belgium

Crystal Palace

Ownership

Owned equally by UK based businessman Steve Parish, Stephen Browett, Martin Long and Jeremy Hosking.

Turnover £14.5m

15th highest in the league

Wage bill £18.8m

12th highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 130%

Directors’ pay No directors were paid

Profit before tax £1.6m (Palace made £13.9m seeling players)

Net debt £7.4m

Interest payable Nil

Accounts for the year to 30 June 2013

State they’re in

In dreamland now, having survived in the Premier League under the inspired turnaround management of Tony Pulis, after being insolvent and in administration in 2010. Were bought then by the four local businessmen, Palace fans, who lent the club £10.7m. They acknowledge that without £13.9m profit made selling players, principally Wilfried Zaha to Manchester United in January 2013, the club would have made a £7.7m loss. They won promotion and survived

Derby County

Ownership

Owned by a US consortium whose principle shareholders are Andy Appleby, Bill Luby, Jeff Mallett, Tom Ricketts, Tom Vertin and W. Brett Wilson.

Turnover £15.4m

12th highest in the league

Wage bill £12.1m

18th highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 79%

Directors’ pay £210,000 for 7 directors; the highest paid received £158,703

Loss before tax £7.1m

Net debt £33.3m

Interest payable £0.5m

Accounts for the year to 30 June 2013

State they’re in

Since the January 2008 takeover by the US based consortium, the owners have invested £41.6m, an expensive effort to finish 10th in 2013. That figure includes £18.5m in loans, with a further £3m advanced after June 30 last year. Such faraway investors have bought Championship clubs to reap the abundant millions of the Premier League, and Derby have their chance to hit that jackpot in the play-off final

Huddersfield Town

Ownership

100% owned by local greetings card businessman Dean Hoyle.

Turnover £11.2m

21st highest in the league

Wage bill £13.4m

16th highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 120%

Directors’ pay Not stated

Loss before tax £4m

Net debt £30.3m

Interest payable £0.028m

Accounts for the year to 31 May 2013

State they’re in

Club with a distinguished history seeking to re-establish itself as one of the bigger provincial forces under the ownership of locan fan Dean Hoyle. His loans by May 2013 were up to £27.2m, illustrating again the swingeing price of keeping up with all the other clubs’ wages and losses. Hoyle has also paid £2m to buy back the club’s original 40% stake in Huddersfield’s landmark modern stadium from the previous owner, Ken Davy, after a long fans’ campaign

Hull City

Ownership

100% owned by local businessman, Assem Allam.

Turnover £17m (including parachute payments)

11th highest in the league

Wage bill £25.9m

6th highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 152%

Directors’ pay £174,667, includes £148,000 management fees paid for Assem and Ehab Allam, and Nick Thompson until April 2013, then £26,667 paid to Thompson by the club.

Loss before tax £25.6m

Net debt £72.2m

Interest payable £2.8m

Accounts for the year to 31 July 2013

State they’re in

The other club, with Cardiff, which won automatic promotion in 2013, and this was the cost of it, a £25.6m loss. Assem Allam and his son Ehab, the club’s vice-chairman, took their loans, at 5% interest, to £72m after buying the club from the brink of insolvency in 2010. That financed wages costing half as much again as the club’s entire turnover, even though they were still paid £6m in parachute payments from the 2010 Premier League relegation

Ipswich Town

Ownership

Owned by Marcus Evans via his company, MEIL, registered in Bermuda

Turnover £13.8m

18th highest in the league

Wage bill £15m

15th highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 109%

Directors’ pay £189,000 for 5 directors; highest paid £170,000

Loss before tax £9.8m

Net debt £82.4m

Interest payable £0.707m

Accounts for the year to 30 June 2013

State they’re in

For those who retain a fond image of Ipswich Town as the homely tractor boys with a certain style, the financial situation is a shock. They still owe Marcus Evans, the conference and hospitality entrepreneur who bought the club in 2008, the £32m debt he took over then at a cut price, together with £11m accrued interest. Evans, who owns Town via his company registered in the tax haven of Bermuda, has also loaned the club £29m interest free

Leeds United

Ownership

85% owned by Gulf Finance House, an investment bank in Bahrain; now sold to Italian-American based agriculture magnate Massimo Cellino.

Turnover £28.6m

3rd highest in the league

Wage bill £20m

11th highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 70%

Directors’ pay £753,938; 8 directors during the year. Highest paid received £524,381 including £220,000 bonus.

Loss before tax £9.4m

Net debt Not stated; £15m loans outstanding

Interest payable £1.2m

Accounts for the year to 30 June 2013

State they’re in

The accounts for the club of serial calamity tell a simple story: Leeds spent more than they earned. The Bahraini bank, Gulf Finance House, which bought Leeds from Ken Bates in 2012, put £11m in, but could not continue, and sold to the US-Italian businessman Massimo Cellino who could yet be barred as an owner if an Italian court’s pending ruling says he evaded tax dishonestly. Leeds’ income, highest in the league without parachute payments, shows the club’s size and sadly unrealised potential

Leicester City

Ownership

100% owned by King Power International, registered in Thailand, owned by Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha

Turnover £19.6m

8th highest in the league

Wage bill £26.1m

5th highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 133%

Directors’ pay £142,000; there were 5 firectors; highest paid received £133,000

Loss before tax £34m

Net debt £111.3m

Interest payable £7.2m

Accounts for the year to 31 May 2013

State they’re in

Standout spenders of the Championship, finally promoted this season. King Power, the Thai-owned duty free conglomerate, bought the club in 2010, explaining “The takeover will internationally promote the reputation of Thailand and the capability of a Thai company to strengthen an English football club.” During 2012-13 King Power provided £80m further loans. While the club say they sought to cut costs since, they are expected to have made another huge loss, fail the financial fair play rules they now oppose, and incur a fine

Middlesbough

Ownership

75% owned by a company controlled by local businessman, Steve Gibson.

Turnover £14.2m

17th highest in the league

Wage bill £20.7m

10th highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 146%

Directors’ pay £4,000 paid; directors were Steve Gibson and Keith Lamb

Loss before tax £18.5m

Net debt Not stated; 75.9m loans owed to Gibson

Interest payable Nil

Accounts for the year to 30 June 2013

State they’re in

So long a Premier League fixture, Middlesbrough are struggling to improve on middling in the Championship. Paid far more in wages than the club’s entire income and are dependent on long-term owner, local transportation company businessman Steve Gibson, for financial survival. Losing £18.5m is huge for Boro; Gibson increased his loans in the year by £6m to almost £80m. He hopes November’s appointment of manager Aitor Karanka, Jose Mourinho’s former assistant at Real Madrid,, who is well-connected in Spain, can spirit a revival

Millwall

Ownership

70.39% owned by Chestnut Hill Ventures LLC, a US company controlled by John G Berylson, Richard A Smith, a trustee of the Philip Smith Deceased Will Trust

Turnover £12.8m

19th highest in the league

Wage bill £12.1m

18th highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 95%

Directors’ pay £162,000; there were seven directors.

Loss before tax £6.2m

Net debt Not stated; £18.8m loans owed

Interest payable £1.9m

Accounts for the year to 30 June 2013

State they’re in

The chairman John Berylson via his US-registered company Chestunut Hill Ventures LLC, had advanced £14m in high interest loans by June 30 2013, according to the accounts. The loans carried interest at 12%, far above current bank rates and the norm at football clubs; £4.2m interest was unpaid. There were further 12% interest loans from other directors and their family members. Berylson wants Millwall to develop land adjoining the Den, but he is in fractious discussions with Lewisham council about the plans

Nottingham Forest

Ownership

Owned by the Kuwaiti businessmen Fawaz Al Hasawi, and Abdulaziz Mubarak Al Hasawi.

Turnover £14.4m

16th highest in the league

Wage bill £21m

8th highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 146%

Directors’ pay hyhyhy £581,000 including £333,000 pay-offs. Highest paid director received £266,000 including a £130,000 pay off.

Loss before tax £17.1m

Net debt £32.4m

Interest payable £0.708m

Accounts for the year to 31 May 2013

State they’re in

The year saw the tragic death at 54 of Nigel Doughty, the childhood Forest fan turned venture capitalist and Labour Party funder, who poured £85m into the club without achieving success. The Al Hasawis took over in July 2012 from Doughty’s estate, which wrote off £65.5m owed. On top of the remaining £20m Doughty loan which they repaid, Al Hasawi loaned £15m to Forest, supporting the loss of £17.1m. Clearly intent on promotion, and after the difficult Billy Davies era, hoping City Ground legend Stuart Pearce can deliver it

Peterborough United

Ownership

Owned by Darragh MacAnthony via DMA Holdings, a company registered in the tax haven of Luxembourg.

Turnover £10m

22nd highest in the league

Wage bill £6.2m

Lowest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 62%

Directors’ pay £203,835; there were six directors. The highest paid received £123,079

Loss before tax £0.043m

Net debt £6.8m

Interest payable £0.318m

Accounts for the year to 31 May 2013

State they’re in

Two year stint in the Championship after promotion from League One came to an end for Posh, finishing 22nd, the same rank as the club’s earning power. Darragh MacAnthony, an Irish holiday homes salesman who took over in 2006, has stayed the course and financially supports the club. In 2012-13 he was repaid around £500,000, leaving £4.6m loans, at commercial interest. Posh, one of the few clubs running a wage bill reasonable for their income, effectively broke even – and were relegated

Sheffield Wednesday

Ownership

100% owned by US company UK Football Investments LLC, which is owned by a trust for the benefit of Milan Mandaric and family

Turnover £14.9m

14th highest in the league

Wage bill £11.9m

21st highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 80%

Directors’ pay £332,000; there were two directors, Paul Aldridge and Milan Mandaric.

Loss before tax £3.7m

Net debt £11m

Interest payable £0.172m

Accounts for the year to 31 May 2013

State they’re in

Milan Mandaric is struggling to work the same formula as he did at the two previous clubs he owned, Portsmouth and Leicester City, both of which he sold at a major profit. Championship economics are more difficult now with owners pouring millions in to subsidise huge losses, and Mandaric took over Wednesday in 2010 after the club had spent ten years in financial difficulties following relegation from the Premier League. Has stabilished, but would sell if any buyer wanted to take a challenge

Watford

Ownership

Owned by Gianpaolo Pozzo, who also owns Udinese, via Hornets Management Sarl, registered in the tax haven of Luxembourg.

Turnover £18.1m

9th highest in the league

Wage bill £12.8m

17th highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 71%

Directors’ pay £420,000; there were five directors. HIghest paid received £240,000.

Profit before tax £0.190m

Net debt £9.5m

Interest payable £0.336m

Accounts for the year to 30 June 2013

State they’re in

Owned by the Italian Pozzo family, long-term owners of Udinese in Serie A, who have restored stability to the club. Watford were in turmoil under the previous owner, Laurence Bassini, who in March 2013 was found guilty of misconduct and banned from positions of authority with any Football League club for three years. Watford mended their finances , morale and operations, and reached the play-offs, although their fielding of multiple players on loan from Udinese was unpopular and led to a tightening of league loan rules

Wolverhampton Wanderers

Ownership

Owned by a Steve Morgan family trust, via a company registered in the tax haven of Guernsey.

Turnover £32.1m

2nd highest in the league

Wage bill £31.1m

4th highest in the league

Wage as a proportion of turnover 97%

Directors’ pay £491,000 paid to one of the five directors, unnamed. Jez Moxey is the chief executive.

Loss before tax £30.4m

Net debt £36m

Interest payable Nil

Accounts for the year to 31 May 2013

State they’re in

A desperate year. Relegation in 2012 from the Premier League, where the owner, housebuilding and hotel magnate Steve Morgan, pledged financial prudence and stability, was a huge blow. Following that near £30m drop in income, even with parachute payments which boosted Wolves’ turnover to the Championship’s second highest, relegation followed again leading to another £30m loss. Promotion as champions has greatly cheered Molyneux again, but it is a long way back

The totals

Turnover £430m

Wages £460 (107% of turnover)

Net debt £947m Loss £349m overall

Financial figures for 2012-13, for the 24 clubs which were in the Championship during 2012-13. All details from most the published annual reports at Companies House. Net debt is as stated in the accounts; debts minus cash held at the bank.

• Additional research by Charlotte Trundley