1: Rivaldo (Brazil v Turkey 3 June 2002)

The Brazilian later admitted to one of the most blatant acts of play acting ever seen. He had little option, amid worldwide ridicule. After Hakan Unsal kicked a ball off Rivaldo's shin, the forward went down clutching his face. Unsal was sent off. "The ball touched my leg, but the other player was still wrong to kick the ball at me," Rivaldo insisted.

2: Thierry Henry (France v Republic of Ireland, 18 November 2009)

There was no luck of the Irish as Henry's crucial and blatant handball in the build-up to a William Gallas goal sent France to the World Cup at their opponents expense, during extra-time in a playoff. Ireland even harboured hopes of a replay of the tie, before such a scenario was rejected by Fifa. Henry said: "I will be honest, it was a handball. But I am not the referee. I played it, the referee allowed it."

3: Luis Suárez (Mansfield v Liverpool 6 January 2013)

Mansfield claimed an FA Cup replay at Anfield had been "stolen" from them after a Suárez handball to create Liverpool's second goal. The Premier League team edged through, 2-1, after 90 minutes. "When you see Luis Suárez laughing as he kicks the ball across the line, he knows himself what happened," said Alan Marriott, the Mansfield goalkeeper.

4: Watford v Reading (20 September 2008)

Reading were handed what was dubbed "the phantom goal" when taking the lead after the match officials mistakenly believed that a ball which had bobbled out of play for a bye kick had, in fact, entered the net. Despite widespread fury inside Vicarage Road, the young referee Stuart Attwell refused to change his mind. The match finished 2-2.

5: Roy Carroll (Manchester United v Tottenham 4 January 2005)

United and Spurs are locked at 0-0 when the visiting midfielder Pedro Mendes spots Roy Carroll off his line. Mendes' 50-yard shot easily crosses the line before Carroll claws it away but none of the officials notice this and play continues. Carroll said: "It was one of those where you just carry on, as the other players did."

6: Slaven Bilic (France v Croatia 8 July 1998)

The solitary red card of Laurent Blanc's decorated career was a costly one, depriving him of a place in France's winning World Cup final team, on their own soil. Blanc was sent off in the tournament's semi-final for an alleged elbow on Bilic, 14 minutes from time as a free-kick was swung into the Croatian penalty area. Replays showed no such offence but Bilic has always remained defiant over the affair.

7: Luis Suárez (Uruguay v Ghana 2 July 2010)

With the scores locked at 1-1, a handball on the goalline by Luis Suárez prevented Ghana's Dominic Adiyiah from a last-minute extra-time goal. Suárez was duly sent off but Ghana missed the resultant penalty and Uruguay progressed to the semi-finals in the shootout that followed. Oscar Tabárez, Uruguay's coach, insisted: "Is Suárez also to blame for Ghana missing the penalty? We try to be dignified and if we lose a match we look for the reasons for it. You shouldn't look to third parties."

8: Luiz Adriano (FC Nordsjaelland v Shakhtar Donetsk 20 November 2012)

Adriano was later charged by Uefa and banned for one game for his part in one of the most controversial goals in Champions League history. Seemingly unaware – or ignoring – that one of his team-mates was attempting to pass the ball back to Nordsjaelland after treatment to an injured player, Adriano raced clear of the defence, rounded the home goalkeeper and scored.

9: Dida (Celtic v Milan 3 October 2007)

Scott McDonald's late winner for Celtic prompted jubilant scenes and caused one home supporter to run on to the pitch to taunt and – only lightly – catch Milan's goalkeeper. In a comedic few seconds, Dida initially gave chase before collapsing in a heap and being taken from the field on a stretcher. Uefa handed Dida a two-game ban for embellishing the incident.

10: Sergio Busquets (Barcelona v Internazionale 28 April 2010)

Inter's Thiago Motto was sent off just 28 minutes into this Champions League tie, for supposedly striking Busquets in the face. The Barcelona man's case, however, was undermined by a sly look through his fingers when rolling on the turf, to check the position and actions of the referee.