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Transfer Fee Only Highlights Why It Is Doomed To Failure
Footytubeblog (Blog) 11 months ago
Financial Fair Play always looked like a hollow threat. A game of chicken, with UEFA desperately hoping that Europe’s clubs don’t call their bluff.

It doesn’t matter whether it’s Gareth Bale at £100 million or 19-year-old Marquinhos at €32 million, FFP has continually had the big boys of European football laugh in its face while they saunter around the shopping aisles for the most lavish and impressive.

Michel Platini may make up the rules as he goes along, tweaking a few guidelines here and there to ensure clubs can’t circumvent, but who stands to lose the most? In the long run, a Champions League without the biggest names in world football is always going to be a tough sell. Do you ban a Radamel Falcao-led Monaco from arguably the best football competition because they had a few drinks one night and felt a little liberal with their credit card? The UEFA president would be taking out one of his own, and as much talk as there has been, I fail to see that becoming a reality.

There is a freedom in football that simply doesn’t exist in the major sports in America. There is no salary cap in this world, assets don’t need to be traded in order to land the next big thing, and league commissioners won’t take their ball and go home.

Football is a marketing dream, and as popular as American football or the NBA is in the U.S and even abroad, it doesn’t sell in the way the Premier League can in further reaches of the world. It’s a playground for the wealthiest, an endless road with which to not only make money, but indulge when there are simply too many zeros to spend in a lifetime.

The system is being manipulated in football, with Manchester City and PSG dipping into their own cash reserves, albeit under a different name, to boost the revenue of their clubs.

There are flaws anyway to FFP. Real Betis are not going to suddenly challenge Real Madrid and Barcelona simply because UEFA tell the big two in Spain to keep an eye of their spend. Recently relegated Wigan aren’t going to bounce back into the top flight and launch a charge on the Premier League title. If anything, they’ll do so without the shackles FFP proposes to put in place.

So what’s the point? Yeah we get it, football is loony. £100 million for anyone is insane. A player from the Ukraine, despite how good he is, cost more this summer than a seasoned Premier League forward last summer. It’s not quite as simple as that, but sometimes it can be. There is no logic to paying €32 million for a kid who cost Roma €5 million 12 months ago. There is going to be no apologies for the way football has turned out.

The American sports are arguably better now that salary caps are in place. The NHL hasn’t had a back-to-back winner of the Stanley Cup since the Detroit Red Wings in 1997 and 1998. The draft system allows for teams to build from the bottom and become powerhouses in the sport. Smaller markets can prove to be successes too, while the biggest in sports have often found difficulties in using their obvious powerbase to their advantage. There is no clearly defined winner.

But the American leagues can be micromanaged to an extent that football never can be. The empire isn’t as vast and the loopholes can be wiped away, though luxury tax in baseball, for example, hasn’t stopped teams like the Yankees, Dodgers and Angels from spending big.

The thing about UEFA is that they are doing a lot of talking. In fact they’ve even dropped the guillotine on a number of occasions already. But those were warning shots, further actions to strengthen their footing while praying, more than hoping, that clubs eventually buckle under the pressure. On the whole though, it has done little. We aren’t talking Champions League money-makers, but instead clubs that would occasionally pop up on a preseason schedule, bar Malaga, who also hold little to no political power.

The point is, though, that clubs are generally not too concerned. There are many who are hoping UEFA stay true to their words, including previous big spenders. But clubs like Real Madrid can talk up their ability to balance the books after buying a Gareth Bale – remember, Florentino Perez thinks marketing first, football second, as well as finances that can be amortised.

There is still time for UEFA to take stern action. But we’re yet to see the effects of their threats. If anything, football spend has gone up as more clubs are finding the means to compete. Players now have traditional and new powers chasing their signatures. The natural result is that prices to go up.

Written by Thomas Hallett

This blog does not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of footytube or its partners.




Honeybabymwah (Manchester United) 11 months ago
I always admired whichever club is on big signing. It doesn't matter so-called financial fair play or whatever its call nowadays we fan want better player playing in better team. It's entertaining after all for football fan who as ever wanted to watch brilliant matches. I also have massive respect to those billionaire owners of respective football clubs simply because without them we wouldn't see more new emerging Champions both domestic and European competitions
Mt1234 (Bolton Wanderers) 11 months ago
Mostly agree, except the part where you suggest FFP can work. Not in its current manifestation
Bambangsafi (Chelsea) 11 months ago
Judi OnlineI always admired whichever club is on big signing. It doesn't matter so-called financial fair play or whatever its call nowadays we fan want better player playing in better team. It's entertaining after all for football fan who as ever wanted to watch brilliant matches. I also have massive respect to those billionaire owners of respective football clubs simply because without them we wouldn't see more new emerging Champions both domestic and European competitions
Ahmadpak (Real Madrid) 11 months ago
Only if we knew how the players felt



   
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