Forums / The Stands: Intelligent Footy Debate
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How Much Is Too Much - When Training A Team
Marcinny (New York Red Bulls) 4 years ago
Maybe he is just trying to have his little revenge for being fired from the club, but the question is how much is too much when you train team.

Ex-coach attacks Roberto Mancini's 'crazy' training at Manchester City

Roberto Mancini's training methods at Manchester City have come under renewed scrutiny amid allegations that he is overworking his players and subjecting them to the possibility of unnecessary injury as well as potentially costing the club millions of pounds.


Joeymac (Manchester United) 3 years ago
Well it's not like they don't have enough money to throw around, so that's probably not a priority
Tigermelon (Arsenal) 3 years ago
At this point it's greater chance for the opponents to get injured...
Chackosan (Arsenal) 4 years ago
Hard to tell. I don't know jack about a pro club's training regimen, but I think ideally it ought to be specialised for each of their players (at least the important ones), considering the wide variations in physique and injury risk
Juno (AC Milan) 4 years ago
Seriously, if the players are not out there training, then what are they doing when we are working 8-10 hrs everyday? Relaxing away? Swimmers and Athletes trained long hours for Olympics, so why can't footballers train 2 session for a couple of days?

Injuries happens. Whether its 2 sessions or no sessions
Adamaus (Manchester United) 3 years ago
I don't think its how much they are training but the intesity of the trainings.    Plus to improve you need to train smarter not harder.
Juno (AC Milan) 3 years ago
And so if the training isn't so intense during the 2 sessions days, a footballer shouldn't cry foul. I rather think the money minded players signed by Man city aren't willing to work hard enough for the titles. Seriously overpaid and underworked! Off to the pitch now! LOL
Juno (AC Milan) 3 years ago
Now am I right in saying so?

Even Kolo agrees: Link: www.goal.com/en/news/9/england/2010/11/21/2224558/...
Ltm017 3 years ago
Yeah I saw this article. I completely agree with him. If its so hard that players are getting hurt that from left to right is different but IMO a lot of people in this world work hard to make a living and I don't see what they have to complain about
Juno (AC Milan) 3 years ago
Link: www.goal.com/en-gb/news/2896/premier-league/2010/1...

And this from Babel. Read the last 5th paragraph. Without sweat!
NYRBforever (New York Red Bulls) 3 years ago
I have a Physical education degree and There is such a thing as overtraining. If you overtrain, you don't perform you're best and are more susceptible to injury. When a person exercises, the muscle fibers are damaged by the load placed on them. Rest and recovery are just important as the exercise itself because rest allows the muscle fibers used to heal and become stronger
Juno (AC Milan) 3 years ago
There's also such things called "no" training. Laziness is not the antidote to titles. Effort put into trainings translate to performance. Training without sweat can only meant that these guys weren't putting enough effort.

I can see players being fit enough to go to nightclubs everytime, however, if they could put the energy into training, then they weren't want to go nightclub when its time to rest. - night is the time where you rest, after you put in effort to work.

Rest and recovery are important as well. But if you are not pushing your body through the roof, why do you need so much rest? And in Babel example, he's not even a regular in the team at the time
Kimaway17 (Liverpool) 3 years ago
They should have light training in the morning and intesive in the evening
Hill (Arsenal) 3 years ago
I believe it should be the other way around
ScooterHayes (Chelsea) 3 years ago
I second that; you're body wears down as the day goes. You want to work harder in the morning as your body wakes up and peaks, then you can "remind" your muscles of the mornings work with a lighter evening,
Tigermelon (Arsenal) 3 years ago
I have no experience training human athlets, but I have worked with horses a lot, and it's amazing how much and how hard you can train a horse when it's fit. As long as you train the right way, ofcourse; building up the body piece buy piece, and not just burning it out. If one part of the body has to work harder then normal to relive an other part, that sure can result in a strain. But to blame the coach for the injuries? Ofcourse he has the main responsiblilty, but what about the rest of the team? Top athlets has plenty of people around them to take care of them...
Hill (Arsenal) 3 years ago
Heavy in the morning light in the afternoon three days a week. The other days it should be on the ball training if there is no game or light jogs and stretch days if it is a game week. The biggest thing is rest. After a game the players who played extensively will need a day maybe two for recovery. Then they should have a light training session one day, and a heavy the next followed by a light on the third.

Its really all about the amount of rest for the players once it gets to be mid-season. If the coach is not structuring them properly then it is his fault players get injured too easily
JustGary (Manchester United) 3 years ago
The answer to the question is - it is different for everybody.

A baseline of tests needs to be established for each player so that a specific individual fitness profile is established. Profiles might include: aspects of speed, stamina, strength, core strength, recovery rates etc. Fitness goals should then be set for each individual which will either improve or maintain their levels of fitness according to their needs to complete their role in the team! As your fitness profile changes (via regular assessment or injury) your training needs should change accordingly. The key to any fitness regime is to have: 1) proper and regular measurement, 2) agreement on fitness goals based on baseline and ongoing measurements, and 3) agreement on the general methods that will be used to achieve the required fitness levels. All of the above is part of what it means to be a professional sports person
Zlatan94310 (PSG) 3 years ago
Pre-season trainings in Italy are known for being quite hard.
As far as, training sessions are concerned, maybe Mancini applied and carried his philisophy over to Manchester City without considering adapting it to the Club`s traning procedures. Which could affect the players ability to perform at their proper level, since overtraining leads to fatigue



   
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